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Therapy Modalities

EMDR (Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing)

EMDR is a psychotherapy that enables people to heal from the symptoms and emotional distress that are the result of disturbing life experiences. Repeated studies show that by using EMDR therapy people can experience the benefits of psychotherapy that once took years to make a difference. It is widely assumed that severe emotional pain requires a long time to heal. EMDR therapy shows that the mind can in fact heal from psychological trauma much as the body recovers from physical trauma

EMDR therapy is a non-invasive, evidence-based method of psychotherapy that facilitates adaptive information processing. EMDR therapy is an eight-phase treatment which comprehensively identifies and addresses experiences that have overwhelmed the brain’s natural resilience or coping capacity, and have thereby generated traumatic symptoms and/or harmful coping strategies. Through EMDR therapy, clients are able to reprocess traumatic information until it is no longer psychologically disruptive.

Motivational Interviewing

Motivational interviewing is a counseling method that helps people resolve ambivalent feelings and insecurities to find the internal motivation they need to change their behavior. It is a practical, empathetic, and short-term process that takes into consideration how difficult it is to make life changes, including sobriety and long term recovery.

Relapse Prevention Therapy (RPT)

RPT is a behavioral self-control program designed to teach individuals who are trying to maintain changes in their behavior by teaching them how to anticipate and cope with the problem of relapse. There are three primary areas of focus in RPT:1) Coping skills training; 2) Cognitive therapy interventions; and 3) Behavioral techniques/lifestyle changes.

Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT)

DBT provides clients with new skills to manage painful emotions and decrease conflict in relationships. DBT specifically focuses on providing therapeutic skills in four key areas. First, mindfulness focuses on improving an individual's ability to accept and be present in the current moment. Second, distress tolerance is geared toward increasing a person’s tolerance of negative emotion, rather than trying to escape from it. Third, emotion regulation covers strategies to manage and change intense emotions that are causing problems in a person’s life. Fourth, interpersonal effectiveness consists of techniques that allow a person to communicate with others in a way that is assertive, maintains self-respect, and strengthens relationships.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT)

CBT is a type of psychotherapy in which patients reframe negative thinking patterns into positive thoughts. Transforming one’s thoughts will ultimately result in positive actions and behaviors in difficult moments.

Solution Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT)

SFBT places focus on a person's present and future circumstances and goals rather than past experiences. In this goal-oriented therapy, the symptoms or issues bringing a person to therapy are typically not targeted. Instead, the therapist encourages those in treatment to develop a vision of the future and offers support as they determine the skills, resources, and abilities needed to achieve that vision successfully.

Seeking Safety

Seeking Safety is an evidence-based, present-focused counseling model to help people attain safety from trauma and/or substance abuse. It may be conducted in either a group and/or individual sessions. It is an extremely safe model as it directly addresses both trauma and addiction, but without requiring the client to delve into the trauma narrative (the detailed account of disturbing trauma memories), thus making it relevant to a very broad range of clients and easy to implement.

Gottman Method of Couples Therapy

The Gottman Method is an approach to couple’s therapy that includes a thorough assessment of the couple’s relationship and integrates research-based interventions based on the Sound Relationship House Theory. Drs. John and Julie Gottman developed nine components of healthy relationships known as The Sound Relationship House Theory of which the therapist at Promise will guide the client and their partner through to promote healing and growth.

The goals of Gottman Method Couples Therapy are to disarm conflicting verbal communication, increase intimacy, respect, and affection, remove barriers that create a feeling of stagnancy in conflicting situations, and create a heightened sense of empathy and understanding within the context of the relationship.